Title

Effects of flipping the principles of microeconomics class: Does scheduling matter?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-8-2018

Abstract

Flipping the principles of microeconomics classroom significantly improves student-learning outcomes compared to traditionally taught lectures; however, it remains unclear as to if the effect differs depending upon the spacing and scheduling of class meetings. This paper investigates if the quantitative effects of flipping on student outcomes differ by scheduling. It further evaluates if student perceptions about flipping vary depending on the spacing of class meetings. This paper shows that students in flipped classes scored significantly higher on final exams compared to those in a traditional setting, and the effect of flipping did not vary with class spacing. Students in the flipped class setting reported significantly more active learning and were significantly more likely to recommend the professor to other students than those in a traditional setting; however, those in the flipped class that met twice a week for 80 min reported significantly less active learning and were significantly less likely to recommend the professor than those in the traditional setting. The results documented in this study suggest that while the effects of flipping on student learning do not vary with class spacing, student satisfaction does differ with spacing. Therefore, when considering the scheduling of a flipped course, instructors need not worry about the impact of flipping on learning outcomes, but they should consider the importance of student satisfaction.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iree.2018.01.002

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