Event Title

Lux Presents Noir: The Presentation of Film Noir Adaptation to Radio on ‘Lux Radio Theater

Presenter Information

James R. Belpedio, Becker College

Location

Panel 26: Kearney 317

Start Date

27-10-2012 3:00 PM

End Date

27-10-2012 4:30 PM

Description

The film noir is a collection of Hollywood films produced between 1941 and 1958 that were dominated by a visual, thematic and tonal style that set them apart from other films released in that same period. Films noir contained seriously flawed protagonists who romanced mysterious bimbos with names like Velda and Flaxy and Velma, who, “behind their bright eyes and red lips existed a moral cesspool” These films further exposed alienation, loneliness and desire through the use of odd camera angles, low cast lighting and the depiction of light and shadow designed to invoke a sordid underside of life. Set in cities, scenes were dominated by vertical lines, tall buildings, alleyways and narrow hallways, as well as flashing neon signs and city streets dampened by recent rains. The effect was visual. The adaptation of this visual style to the aural medium of radio posed some rather interesting, but surmountable difficulties.

This paper will explore the adaptation of a select few important films noir, such as The Maltese Falcon, The Big Clock and Pitfall, to radio plays in the anthology radio series, The Lux Radio Theater. This radio series, beginning in 1935 and lasting until 1955, featured a recently released motion picture as a one hour radio play every Sunday evening on CBS during that twenty year period. The radio series was the most expensive and the most lavishly produced program, setting the standard of excellence during the golden years of radio broadcasting. Using the best writers and soundmen, and also a casts of prominent movie stars, the show averaged $50, 000.00 per week to produce. Top shows averaged about $30,000.00, while half-hour dramas and sit-coms averaged $6,000 to $10,000.00 per week.

The presentation will emphasize the task of presenting “visual” dialogue, effective sound effects and appropriate musical bridges, plus the usual voice-over narrative approach to create the visual effects of the Noir films in an aural medium.

This is part of an ongoing study so that a conclusion is still pending.

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Oct 27th, 3:00 PM Oct 27th, 4:30 PM

Lux Presents Noir: The Presentation of Film Noir Adaptation to Radio on ‘Lux Radio Theater

Panel 26: Kearney 317

The film noir is a collection of Hollywood films produced between 1941 and 1958 that were dominated by a visual, thematic and tonal style that set them apart from other films released in that same period. Films noir contained seriously flawed protagonists who romanced mysterious bimbos with names like Velda and Flaxy and Velma, who, “behind their bright eyes and red lips existed a moral cesspool” These films further exposed alienation, loneliness and desire through the use of odd camera angles, low cast lighting and the depiction of light and shadow designed to invoke a sordid underside of life. Set in cities, scenes were dominated by vertical lines, tall buildings, alleyways and narrow hallways, as well as flashing neon signs and city streets dampened by recent rains. The effect was visual. The adaptation of this visual style to the aural medium of radio posed some rather interesting, but surmountable difficulties.

This paper will explore the adaptation of a select few important films noir, such as The Maltese Falcon, The Big Clock and Pitfall, to radio plays in the anthology radio series, The Lux Radio Theater. This radio series, beginning in 1935 and lasting until 1955, featured a recently released motion picture as a one hour radio play every Sunday evening on CBS during that twenty year period. The radio series was the most expensive and the most lavishly produced program, setting the standard of excellence during the golden years of radio broadcasting. Using the best writers and soundmen, and also a casts of prominent movie stars, the show averaged $50, 000.00 per week to produce. Top shows averaged about $30,000.00, while half-hour dramas and sit-coms averaged $6,000 to $10,000.00 per week.

The presentation will emphasize the task of presenting “visual” dialogue, effective sound effects and appropriate musical bridges, plus the usual voice-over narrative approach to create the visual effects of the Noir films in an aural medium.

This is part of an ongoing study so that a conclusion is still pending.