Date of Award/Publication

2007

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

MS in Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education

Abstract

This paper investigates the biases that may cause middle school through college age girls from continuing in a technology track. Secondary purposes were to find suggestions as to possible classroom modifications that are proven to encourage greater female participation in technology and to locate Government agencies, educational institutions and private industries that offer suppm1 for young girls interested in technology. The biases appeared to be due to a variety of outside influences such as the entertainment and advertising industry, family and the ways in which girls perceive the use of technology. Girls are constantly being shown how they should act, what they should look like and the activities and careers that make them acceptable. Girls often feel inferior to boys in a technology class and need proper support from the teacher to insure equal footing. Mentoring, giving the girls a positive role model is essential to young girls developing a positive attitude toward technology. There are a number of agencies available that are sponsored by the government, private industry and the education community, many of which are maintained and supported by combinations of each. These agency sponsored resources, offer support to the female student, her parents and teacher such as free mentoring, tuition assistance and lesson planning with the female student in mind.

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