Date of Award

8-2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Executive Leadership

Abstract

Charter schools have emerged as a viable option for parents and students who seek educational options. Currently there are approximately 5,000 charter schools nationally, which serve more than 1.5 million students. As charter schools continue to enroll students, there are increased leadership opportunities within charter school organizations. Presently, there is a limited body of research that analyzes the leadership affect of charter school leaders who have transitioned from public school leadership positions. This study analyzed this growing population of charter school leaders to ascertain factors associated with the high attrition rate of charter school leaders. In addition, the study sought to determine if transformational and/or transactional leadership styles were evidenced as characteristics of these charter school leaders. This qualitative research study used data solicited from interviews of five charter school leaders. The data was analyzed to identify factors that contributed to the high attrition rate of charter school leaders. The data uncovered factors such as principal burnout due to the many responsibilities required of charter school leadership and the lack of sufficient entrepreneurial training as a rationale to explain this trend. In addition, evidence of transformational and/or transactional leadership styles was identified. However, transactional leadership style was the dominant style for these leaders as a significant amount of their leadership responsibilities hinged on the concept of rewards and punishment.

Included in

Education Commons

Share

COinS