Date of Award

8-2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Executive Leadership

Abstract

Federal and state mandated linguistic and academic supports for English Language Learners (ELLs) compete for instructional time, resulting in ELLs being pulled away from the general population of students multiple times per day. Grounded in the socio-cognitive and socio-cultural theories, the research investigated the correlation between the amount of time ELL students were segregated from the general population for the purposes of delivering instructional support services and their self-efficacy perceptions to succeed in school. The study also examined the correlation between the number of different academic support services ELL students received and their self-efficacy perceptions to succeed in school. A modified Morgan and Jinks Self-Efficacy Survey (MJSES) (1999) was administered to 172 ELL students at four elementary schools in a New York State suburban school district. Results showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the number of minutes Latino students were separated from the general education population of students and their self-efficacy to succeed in school. Analysis also showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the number of different interventions received by Latino ELL students and their self-efficacy to succeed. Recommendations include reexamining instructional time frames and the number of different interventions required, clustering ELLs on a grade level, implementing a collaborative push-in model, expanding the school day to increase academic instructional time, providing opportunities to increase the protective factors of at-risk students, and increasing professional development for teachers. v

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